The Dorval Historical Society, in collaboration with the Dorval Library and the Dorval Museum of Local History and Heritage, is pleased to present this year's series of free lectures which take place on Saturdays at 2 p.m. at the Dorval Library located at 1401 Lakeshore Drive in Dorval.  All are welcome to attend.


THEN AND NOW: OUR STORIES… LES IROQUOIENS DU SAINT-LAURENT, LES HABITANTS DE LA VALLÉE DU SAINT-LAURENT AU MOMENT DE LA VISITE DE CARTIER

Saturday, September 7, at 2 p.m.

In the Dorval Library Activity Room
Presented in French by Roland Tremblay M. Sc., prehistorian archaeologist

                                                                                                                                                   Iroquoien vase

When Jacques Cartier moved up the St. Lawrence Valley in the fall of 1535, he noticed the presence of numerous villages of people who grew corn and lived in long houses covered with bark. Who were these people exactly? 


THEN AND NOW: OUR STORIES… L’ART POPULAIRE : UN ART QUI FAIT SOURIRE

Saturday, October 5, at 2 p.m.

In the Dorval Library Activity Room
Presented in French by Adrien Levasseur, folk art collector
                                                                                                                                                       Artist : Léo Lapierre

What is a folk art collection? Adrien Levasseur, a passionate collector of this playful and therapeutic form of art, offers an interview inspired by his story, his collection, his interest in the conservation of Quebec heritage, and much more! Supported by more than 100 images highlighting folk art, its nuances, its materials and various themes, his presentation will have you discover who these sculptors are, where they come from, what they are making, and why. Folk art is not always utilitarian, but it will always make you smile.


THEN AND NOW: OUR STORIES… 100 YEARS OF BUSES IN MONTREAL

Saturday, November 9, at 2 p.m.
In the Dorval Library’s Activities Room
Bilingual presentation by

Benoît Clairoux, historian and advisor at the Société des Transports de Montréal (STM)
Jaysen Constantin, former bus driver at the STM
Robert Lacombe, a great collector of Montreal bus photography
Jean-François Lacourse, bus mechanic at the STM.

The Montreal bus network will turn 100 on November 22, 2019! It was in 1919 that the first bus, built from a White truck by employees of the Montreal Tramways Company, began service on Saint-Étienne Street, now called Bridge. Since the history of buses has always been obscured by subways and trams, four enthusiasts unite their knowledge to present their new book on the history of buses in Montréal, published by GID Publishing. For the occasion, they will present a slideshow of hundreds of bus images and so much more! You are invited to hop on the bus... and to move to the back!



                                                                                                                                    First bus - 1919






THEN AND NOW: OUR STORIES… WHEN SANTA CLAUS OUSTED BABY JESUS IN FRENCH QUEBEC

Saturday, December 7, at 2 p.m.
In the Dorval Library’s Activities Room
Bilingual presentation by Jean-Philippe Warren, sociologist

Christmas has not always been the center of interest with French Canadians through the months of December and January. Up until the late 19th century, New Year’s Eve was THE most important wintertime celebration within the community. Under the joint influence of Catholic priests and shopkeepers, French Canadians gradually began to celebrate and cherish Christmas more than New Year’s Eve. But, where the clergy had wanted to impose the image of baby Jesus, it would finally be Santa Claus who would quickly become the unimpeachable holiday symbol.


                                                                                                                        Credit: Daily Star, December 24, 1900




Upcoming Lectures